Lucidpress Features Me in a Case Study

March 8, 2015

Editor’s note: Lucidpress, the company whose graphics software I use for image posts like Paintings for a Snowy Day, is featuring me in a case study on their new website. Thanks to Vicky Thomas and her colleagues for a sweet boost! Check out five other Lucidpress users at the Case Study Home. — MAB

JOYOUS PARADOX BLOG AND 4-BOOK REST SERIES

Mary Ann Barton | Maynard, MA, USA

Independent blogger and author Mary Ann Barton was just looking for a way to spice up her blog with infographics and other visuals when she discovered Lucidpress’s digital publication toolbox. Now she’s amazed at how thoroughly it transformed the way she works.

AT A GLANCE

COMPANY DESCRIPTION

Joyous Paradox is a blog written for the benefit of the elderly and their caregivers. The Rest series is a collection of four books written for the same audience, set to be released in the future.

FEATURES THEY LOVE

  • Cloud based – edit documents anywhere, any time
  • Ease of use – intuitive interface empowers users who don’t have design experience

CHALLENGE

Mary Ann wanted to do something different for her blog readers. A talented writer, she was used to communicating with her primary audience—individuals caring for elderly family members—through text-heavy blog posts. Hoping to design content that would better capture her audience’s attention, she began looking for a way to incorporate attractive visuals into her posts.

At the same time, Mary Ann was in the midst of writing a 4-part book series intended for the same audience. She wanted to ensure that the resulting eBook would be aesthetically pleasing but wasn’t sure she had enough design experience to do it herself.

SOLUTION

The first thing that Mary Ann noticed about Lucidpress was its ease of use. Intuitive drag-and-drop controls and elegant templates enabled her to turn out one polished graphic after another, despite the fact that she had never designed such visuals before. Soon she was adding her own content to Lucidpress’s newsletter template to create infographics and images with text overlays. From there, she simply exported her creations as PNGs and embedded them in her blog posts. As a bonus, she discovered that she could also design the covers of her books using Lucidpress’s pre-created magazine templates.

RESULTS AND IMPACT

INTEGRATED CREATIVE PROCESS. Now that she uses Lucidpress, the visual and textual components of Mary Ann’s work go hand in hand. Energy and enthusiasm have replaced the stress that once accompanied questions of layout and design. For example, she’s found that toying with image placement within Lucidpress actually sparks her creativity and inspires her writing. Describing this change, she said, “It’s truly astounding what a difference this tool has made. I wouldn’t have been able to write that poem without it—it just wouldn’t have come out the way it did. Nor would I have been able to see it on my screen in this book setting. The designing and writing are happening side by side.” Thanks to Lucidpress, Mary Ann has more creative freedom than ever before.

BETTER ENGAGEMENT. Readership on the blog has increased, as have the number of followers, since Mary Ann began using Lucidpress. Although it’s impossible to say how much of that growth can be attributed to the documents she creates in Lucidpress, Mary Ann said, “Given how prominent visual elements are in the blog world, I think it probably plays a big part.”

COST SAVINGS. Without Lucidpress, Mary Ann says she would have had to hire a professional designer to draft her book covers. Even though her initial goal in using Lucidpress was to create blog content, she was pleased to discover this unexpected benefit.

Though our software is simple to learn, it’s filled with powerful features that meet your unique publishing needs.As you discover the ease of designing with Lucidpress, you’ll wonder why you ever did it any other way.

SEE FOR YOURSELF WHY JOYOUS PARADOX AND OTHER SMALL BUSINESSES ARE MAKING THE SWITCH TO LUCIDPRESS.

SIGN UP FREE

Source: Lucidpress  Disclosure: I am not receiving any monetary compensation for mentioning Lucidpress. Just enduring fame. — MAB


More Joyous Paradox posts with graphics created in Lucidpress software:

How Art and Music Bring Happiness to Dementia Care: Part 1

The Trifecta of Happiness

Today Love Asks Questions

Self-Caring: What I Think About the Funnel of Love

Dear Readers, I’m Getting Back in Touch with You

Paintings for a Snowy Day

 

 

 

Cities Are Not Empty Pages

“Cities are not empty pages,” writes German sociologist Rolf Lindner. He continues, “There are cities which are like a penny dreadful, a dime novel, stained and well-thumbed and with a garish, torn cover, while others are more like an expensive edition of a classic author, leather bound, with thread-stitching and a bookmark. “– Rolf Lindner, “The Cultural Texture of the City,” Linköping University Electronic Press, 2006.

Growing Old in East Harlem: a video about the East Harlem Aging Improvement District from The New York Academy of Medicine on Vimeo.

Dear Readers,

For me, urban life is more memory than presence. Since 1977, I’ve migrated from big-city Chicago to small-town Henniker, NH, to suburban Boston. I visit cities mostly for refreshment, these days, instead of daily needs.

Yet a film set in East Harlem, New York City, has brought me back to the jam-packed, extravagant, messy, compelling pages of the urban life I knew as a teenager and young adult in Chicago. Watch “Growing Old in East Harlem.” You’ll see the pages fill up with stories.

Thanks for being here,

Mary Ann

PS: Below is a description of the film from the New York Academy of Medicine. You can read more about East Harlem’s status as an Age-Friendly City at the Silberman School of Social Work.

“On August 31, 2010, NYAM previewed a new film, “Growing Old in East Harlem” in which seniors were interviewed about the joys and challenges of aging in this diverse, dynamic neighborhood in New York. Growing Old in East Harlem was filmed and directed by Dorian Block, policy associate at NYAM. It was produced and edited by Jonathan Mena and Jessie Daniels, both of Hunter College.

“More than 200 older adults, community leaders, and business representatives from East Harlem gathered at NYAM to view the film and to discuss the findings of a recent study of older adults in East Harlem who expressed concerns and improvements they would like to see in their community. The assessment and resulting event are part of Age-Friendly NYC, a collaboration between NYAM, the Mayor’s Office, and the New York City Council.” — NYAM, 2010

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Winter Chestnuts and Other Literary Comforts

Mary Ann Barton:

Editor’s note: I found this essay about food by literary scholar Sara Davis utterly irresistible, partly because it’s so deftly written, and partly because I’ve been struggling with an essay on caregiving and eating for my book Rest: Finding Rest and Renewal as We Care for Others. Food as comfort, comfort as food: such a theme in my life! And all those questions! How to take pleasure in food without tipping into over-consumption and craving? How to recover from deep dives into old habits? How to love flavors and then let them go? I don’t have any answers, dear friends, except to keep on reading, writing, and renewing.

 

 

Originally posted on Scenes of Eating:

I’ve been reading Lolly Willowes, a 1926 novel by Sylvia Townsend Warner set at the turn of the 20th century. The story reminds me a lot of the pastoral 19th century novels I’ve been reading: country life radically contrasted with the city, the smallness of family dramas, the quiet resistance of women in their domestic spheres.

When she moves to London with her brother and sister-in-law, main character Laura (called Lolly by her nieces) is seized by a restlessness every autumn. She finds herself roving and anxious until winter fully arrives and she bleakly resigns to it, and:

She fortified herself against the dismalness of this reaction by various small self-indulgences. Out of these she had contrived for herself a sort of mental fur coat. Roasted chestnuts could be bought and taken home for bedroom eating. Second-hand book-shops were never so enticing; and the combination of east winds and London water…

View original 766 more words

Jesse and the Typewriter Shop

Editor’s note: I took typing one summer at Schurz High School in Chicago and still remember the class fondly. Mary Maldonado and I used to walk home from class together in the suffocating heat of a Midwestern city. Sometimes I’d walk her all the way to her house, hoping to catch a glimpse of her older brother, Paul, who played bassoon in my high school band. I still have my mother’s pale green Olivetti typewriter that she lugged around in her post-retirement travels from Chicago to Kentucky to Montana to New Jersey to New Hampshire to Massachusetts.  Here, reblogged from The Casual Optimist, is a touching film about father-and-son typewriter repairmen in Los Angeles. Do you have an old typewriter somewhere in the house? Do you still use it? — MAB

Related to yesterday’s post on Gramercy Typewriter Co. in New York, here’s a short film about U.S. Office Machines, one of the last remaining typewriter repair shops in Los Angeles:

(Thanks Sam!)

Hot Valentine’s Day

It’s Valentine’s Day. Things are heating up in our house.

1. Hot kisses.

Loving Couple (Mithuna)

Loving Couple (Mithuna), stone sculpture from 13th century India (Orissa), via Metropolitan Museum of Art, Purchase, Florance Waterbury Bequest, 1970.

2. Hot food.

Inside of a Cottage from A History of Madeira, 1821

Inside of a Cottage [detail] from A History of Madeira by “a resident of the island” (published by R. Ackermann, London), unknown artist, Madeira Islands, 1821, via Wikimedia Commons.

3. Warm cat.

Cold Nose, Warm Touch, Thermography of a Cat by yellowcloud

Cold Nose, Warm Touch, Thermography of a Cat by yellowcloud from Germany, 2011, via Wikimedia Commons.

4. Hot you, man.

Academic Study of a Male Torso by Ingres

Academic Study of a Male Torso by Jean August Dominique Ingres, French, 1801, via Wikimedia Commons.

5. The body, beautiful at any age.

Nude Old Man in the Sun by Mariano Fortuny

Nude Old Man in the Sun by Mariano Fortuny, Spanish, 1862-1863, via Wikimedia Commons.

6. Hot me, woman.

Venus with a Mirror by Titian

Venus with a Mirror by Titian, Italian, circa 1550, via Wikimedia Commons.

7. The body, beautiful at any age.

Old Woman at the Mirror by Bernardo Strozzi

Old Woman at the Mirror by Bernardo Strozzi, Italian, circa 1615, via Wikimedia Commons.

8. Hot dog! Hot Dog by Jkrane2, via Wikimedia Commons.

Dr. Atul Gawande in Being Mortal, a Frontline documentary on PBS

“Being Mortal” Airs Tonight

“The two big unfixables are aging and dying…you can’t fix those.” — Atul Gawande

Editor’s note: PBS airs a documentary tonight based on Atul Gawande’s book Being Mortal. It promises to be a candid and intimate look at doctors and families coming to terms with the end of life. This article by Stephanie E. Rogers, MD, appears in the blog Geripal. — MAB, 2/10/2015

The True Art of Medicine: Atul Gawande and The Being Mortal Documentary

by Stephanie E. Rogers, MD @SERogersMD

“The two big unfixables are aging and dying…you can’t fix those,” notes physician-writer Dr. Atul Gawande, in a new documentary based on his recent book Being Mortal. The Frontline documentary airs Tuesday, February 10 on PBS, and explores Gawande’s frustration of not being able to “fix” all of his patients.

The Being Mortal documentary examines how Gawande and other physicians struggle to talk with patients and families about death and dying. He explores his own humble journey with the realization that “medicine fails the people it’s supposed to help” at the end of life. It also provides a powerful, intimate look at families struggling with conversations about the realities of aging and death, and the uncomfortable and difficult time even well-trained physicians have at leading these discussions.

One of the most startling aspects of the documentary is watching physicians participate in these conversations with patients and the behind the scenes look at what their thoughts are regarding these discussions. Even with cancer physicians who have these conversations all the time, it is apparent that they too are struggling to be forthright and eloquent. In fact, this is what makes Gawande a skillful storyteller — he exposes his own vulnerabilities both as a physician trying not to be the bearer of bad news and as a patient’s family member during his father’s inevitable death from a spinal cord tumor.

“Hope is not a plan,” Dr. Gawande argues. “We find from our trials that we are literally inflicting therapies on people that shorten their lives and increase their suffering, due to an inability to come to good decisions.” He notes that people may have other priorities besides living longer and that we should not be waiting until the last week of life to have these discussions with our patients.

As a Geriatrics fellow, I have learned that speaking to patients frankly about aging, dying, and their priorities for the time they have left has been the toughest challenge I’ve encountered yet in my decade of medical training. We physicians tend to be overly optimistic and timid about the truth, partly because it is difficult to tell a patient something they don’t want to hear. We want to instill confidence in our patients and hope with them for a cure or more time.

I now realize that the most worthy challenge– one likely to last my entire career – is to improve my ability to have these conversations. Our decisive goal as physicians is not only to know the most up-to-date scientific studies or treatments, but to be comfortable and capable of communicating truthfully and empathetically to our patients about the realities of life — that we will all age and we will all die. The true challenge is combining all our medical knowledge and skills with the art of communication, to allow our patients to choose how they want to live—all the way to the end. Being Mortal, the Frontline documentary from writer/producer/director Tom Jennings, airs Tuesday, February 10 on PBS and will stream in full online at pbs.org/frontlinehttp://pbs.org/frontline.

Source: Stephanie E. Rogers, MD, “The True Art of Medicine: Atul Gawande and The Being Mortal Documentary,” GeriPal: A  Geriatrics and Palliative Care Blog (blog), February 9, 2015, http://www.geripal.org/2015/02/atul-gawande-being-mortal-documentary.html.
The Snowy Winter of 1918, New York, by Childe Hassam

Winter Caregiver Prayer

Dear Winter Caregiver, my Northern Hemisphere sleet-and-snow companion, you sliding on tiny, bouncing, translucent balls of ice in the Stop ‘N Shop parking lot, on your way to collect loaves and fishes for my dinner and yours, may you steer your way through the grocery aisles with my blessing.

In times past, I ran this errand for myself and my loved ones — able to run freely, then, though not during ice storms, remembering their preferences for golden raisins or pumpernickel bread, wheeling my cart past the lettuces (now a swallowing hazard), stopping in the frozen treats department to scan for sugar-free ice cream.

Once I gave. Now I receive. All I have left to give you is gratitude, that and clear direction, a shopping list printed with my wavering pen in hand, and forgiveness for any lapses in concentration.

Pace yourself, dear Winter Caregiver. Whatever the results of tomorrow’s biopsy, I’m stuck with the durable truths of life: that sleet falls in every New England winter; that daybreak rises from the bed of night; that night will fold me in her arms, one night, forever; that we all sleep, sometime, folding our bodies into the good earth with one last act of generosity.

— Mary Ann Barton

Editor’s note: I wrote this prayer from the point of view of someone who receives care, so it’s not about me. I’m still able to run freely, for which I’m grateful. But I can imagine a time when the roles will be reversed. The piece was first published in the newsletter of First Parish in Concord, MA (Unitarian Universalist) . — MAB

Image credit:  The Snowy Winter of 1918, New York, by Childe Hassam, American, 1918, via Wikimedia Commons.