Paintings for a Snowy Day

Tuesday, January 27, 2015

Editor’s Note: I’m at home today, watching the snow fall and looking at paintings of snow scenes in Wikimedia Commons. Why not share these with someone you love? You could use them as prompts for writing, telling stories, or making art with the children — or grownups — in your life. — MAB 

A family watches as snow begins to fallA family watches as snow begins to fall: The First Snow by Adrian Ludwig Richter, German, 19th century, via Wikimedia Commons.

Now snow fills the streetNow snow fills the street: Fiskaregränd (Fishermen Alley) in Stockholm by Axel Axelson, Swedish (1854-1892), no date, via Wikimedia Commons.

Bundle up, my friends!Bundle up, my friends! Artillery Street in Winter by Alf Wallander, Swedish, 1892, via Wikimedia Commons.

Dressing warmly helpsDressing warmly helps: Girl in the Snow by József Rippl-Rónai, Hungarian, 1906, via Wikimedia Commons.

Snow is also for playingSnow is also for playing: Snow Balls by Bertha Boynton Lum, American, ca. 1913, via Wikimedia Commons.

In the woods, foxes step softlyIn the woods, foxes step softly: Common Foxes in the Snow by Friedrich Wilhelm Kuhnert, German, 1893, via Wikimedia Commons.

At the end of the day, let's warm up with hot drinks and a game of cardsAt the end of the day, let’s warm up with hot drinks and a game of cards: Getting Ready for a Game by Carl Larsson, Swedish, 1901, via Wikimedia Commons.

The Swedish National Museum gives us Larsson’s description of Getting Ready for a Game:

“It’s really terrible outdoors. The wind is whistling through the joints of the house and the snow is not snow but sharp needles that get into the corners of one’s eyes… Just the right time for a game of ‘vira’. Here is the tray full of comforting drinks and all the necessaries and Karin is still not finished with the final decorations which include the monastery liqueur which she is taking off the shelf. In the background is the altar itself, the card table that I have arranged myself.”

[This is] Carl Larsson’s own description of his painting, Getting Ready for a Game, in the book entitled Larssons which was published by Bonniers in 1902. The “vira” that Carl Larsson mentioned was an enormously popular card game invented in Sweden sometime in the 19th century.

 

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